Page 22

ACEF Journal Vol 3 Issue 1 December 2012

Educational Equity in Rural Schools Information of several environmental factors in rural school buildings was collected: air quality, air filtration system, local exhaust system, heating system, air conditioning, and acoustics control of buildings. Four major features in rural school buildings include (a) roof; (b) foundations; (c) drywall, plaster, and bricks; and (d) exterior and interior walls. Four minor features include: (a) interior water supply, (b) exterior water supply, (c) lockers, and (d) male/female restrooms. Information about rural school building safety includes: (a) fire alarms, smoke detectors, and sprinkler systems; (b) light sources; and (c) emergency lighting. The information on energy efficiency in rural school buildings was collected regarding: (a) fluorescent lighting, (b) building envelopes, and (c) building energy efficiency. Finally, the survey asked information about the following building accessibility features: (a) handicapped accessibility, (b) vehicular entrances and exits, (c) pedestrian services, (d) student drop-off area, and (e) bus loading area. The survey questions were designed to be used by the district superintendent as a guide for observing and assessing school building conditions. The survey responses reflect the perceptions of the school district superintendent on school building condition, but are not intended to be used as strict objective measures. To minimize subjective ratings by surveyors, the following five point scale was used to rate the quality of school building conditions for each survey item: (a) Excellent: new or easily restorable to “like new” condition; only minimal routine maintenance required; (b) Satisfactory: only routine maintenance or minor repair required; (c) Borderline: fails to meet code and functional requirement in some cases, failure(s) are inconvenient, extensive corrective maintenance and repairs are required; (d) Poor: consistent substandard performance; failure(s) are disruptive and costly; fails most code and functional requirements; requires constant attention, renovation, or replacement; major corrective repair or overhaul required; and (e) N/A: not applicable. The “Building Capacity” section collected information on the number of rooms in (a) standard learning space, such as regular classrooms, special education classrooms, and science classrooms or laboratories; and (b) support facility space, such as business classroom, music and art rooms, and gymnasiums. Measure of School Building Capacity To accurately assess the school building capacity, the PDE enrollment projection data and PlanCon data were utilized. The PlanCon data provided a standard unit capacity for calculating building capacities. For example, the unit capacity for half-time kindergarten is 50 students and the unit capacity for full-time kindergarten is 25. Classroom capacity is normally calculated on the basis of 25 students per regular classroom. Other values are assigned to laboratories, gymnasiums, art rooms, music rooms, etc. Using these data, the school building capacity can be calculated according to the following formula: Elementary School Building Capacity = ∑ (Number of Instructional Unit) × (Unit Capacity). Secondary School Building Capacity = ∑ (Number of Instructional Unit) × (Unit Capacity) × (Building Utilization Factor) December 2012 / ACEF 22


ACEF Journal Vol 3 Issue 1 December 2012
To see the actual publication please follow the link above