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ACEF Journal Vol 3 Issue 1 December 2012

Klocko (NEP) (Dunlap & VanLiere, 1978). Each question was designed to examine the five components of an ecological worldview as described in Table 1. Table 1 Superintendents’ Ecological Worldview as Measured by the New Ecological Paradigm Scale Pro-Environmental Construct Mean Score (n = 7) Reality Limits of Growth 3.05 Rejection of Anthropocentrism 3.09 Fragility of Nature’s Balance 3.33 Rejection of Exemptionalism 3.72 Possibility of an Ecocrisis 3.57 The quantitative data were examined through the Dunlap and VanLiere’s (1978) Ecological Paradigm Scale (NEP). A rating was calculated on a scale of 1 to 5, where 3.0 would indicate a neutral response. Scores below 3.0 suggested a negative ecological worldview and scores from 3.1 to 5.0 indicated a positive worldview as determined by their responses to the NEP that was embedded in the survey instrument (see Appendix A). Only one response indicated opposition to the pro-ecological view, voicing strong agreement that the ecological crisis had been greatly exaggerated. All other superintendents indicated a neutral or slightly positive pro-ecological worldview (overall mean = 3.35) in their responses to the NEP scale that was embedded within the on-line survey. However, it was interesting to note that while these superintendents did not identify themselves as strong environmentalists in the survey, they did so in the interviews, in no uncertain terms. One superintendent revealed his ecological worldview, “This is important, not only in terms of educational programming, but the larger impact on our community environmentally. Can we set an example by designing and investing in the building right?” Another superintendent added, “Any future construction or design project will take green into consideration. We want to minimize our footprint.” These responses indicate awareness as well as a commitment to sustainability on the part of the superintendent. Board of education trustees who held true to environmental sustainability were able to move sustainable initiatives forward as they enlisted the support of the superintendents. In several communities, it was suggested that a community that embraced environmental sustainability would only hire a superintendent who shared this foundational value. Triple bottom line approach. Superintendents who could articulate a vision of sustainability that focused on the triple bottom line approach, which incorporated the environmental, social (educational), and economic principles of sustainability were viewed by their constituents as effective stewards. Every superintendent and board trustee in this study reflected on the importance of stewardship as part of their essential mission. While there was no 65 Vol. 3, No. 1, 2012


ACEF Journal Vol 3 Issue 1 December 2012
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