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ACEF Journal Vol 3 Issue 1 December 2012

Klocko There is little mystery in what superintendents must do to take the lead in designing sustainable schools. The goal of building sustainable high-performance learning centers is well within the grasp of leaders who maintain their vision, commit to transparency, and are stewards of triple bottom line sustainability. This discussion about sustainable school buildings will adjust its focus to incorporate a more balanced and equitable consideration of the social, educational, and economic missions of the district and better serve the needs of the children who learn there. This study was primarily exploratory and descriptive by design. It was exploratory in the sense that it examined all the significant events, demographics, and traditional practices that led to the decision to construct a sustainable school. It was descriptive in that it defined the aspects of each district’s unique experiences as theysought to green their schools. The strength of this case study approach is that it was theoretically neutral and interdisciplinary in scope. The extensive case study explorations were invaluable as a means to inform the design decision-making of a superintendent. This case study provides a valuable tool to the superintendent in order to generate an understanding of what everything means for that superintendent within the context of that school district. Another superintendent can formulate an understanding of the events and priorities at another district not only based on past experiences, training, education, and cognitive capabilities, but also on the experiences of the leaders presented in these case studies. This understanding may allow the superintendent to infer what might happen under similar circumstances and suggest means to predetermine inherent implications. The triple bottom line approach to sustainability was extended to endorse the core mission of schools. Additionally, sensemaking, originally used to describe informational technology pathways, suitably described the way superintendents’ actions are based on their interpretations of extensive quantities of non-perfect, irregular information. With the heavy demands on superintendents and school boards, it is apparent that leadership in designing contemporary school buildings for future needs should be associated with skills and not traits of the leader. Ultimately, the demand for superintendents committed to sustainable practices will only be exceeded by the demands placed upon them. References Altes, T. (2007). When it’s greener to build.Environmental Building News, Retrieved from http://www.buildinggreen.com/auth/article.cfm/2007/9/28/When-It-s-Greener-To-Build/ Anderson, G. (1996). The cultural politics of schools: Implications for leadership. In K. Leithwood, J. Chapman, D. Corson, P., & A. Hart (Eds.). International handbook of educational leadership and administration (pp. 967-996). Norwell, MA: Kluwer. Bogdan, R. C., & Biklen, S. K. (1982). Qualitative research for education: An introduction to theory and methods. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon, Inc. Collins, D. (2007). Buildings are one of the largest greenhouse reduction opportunities. School Planning and Management, 46(12), 5. Creswell, J. (2008). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method approaches. (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Cubberley, E. (1920). The history of education. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Co. Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and education: An introduction to the philosophy of education. New York, NY: Free Press. DiNola, R., & Guerra, J. (2002). Green building and school construction. School Planning and Management, 41(5), 40-43. 67 Vol. 3, No. 1, 2012


ACEF Journal Vol 3 Issue 1 December 2012
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